June 26, 2019, 04:13:32 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Does This Interest You, Maggie?  (Read 780 times)
Dan
Administrator
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 24
Offline Offline

Location: Boston
Posts: 7500

Thank You
-Given: 224
-Receive: 362


Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'


« on: January 19, 2018, 08:28:02 PM »

The new GoldWing is available in an automatic transmission.  You can even get one without the topbox.

Logged

Practicing Normite.
SilverBullet
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 22
Offline Offline

Location: Wausau Wi.
Bikes Owned: Pearl
Posts: 4388

Thank You
-Given: 389
-Receive: 196


Email
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 02:57:17 AM »

90 lbs lighter than last year? My 02 handles like a dream! I can't begin to imagine what this can do!
Logged

02 Gl 1800 GoldWing
89 Pacific Coast 800 
2012 Burgman 650 Burgman Trike
EZMark
RCR
Doctor of Scooterology
*

Karma: 9
Offline Offline

Location: Swansea, IL
Posts: 1433

Thank You
-Given: 2
-Receive: 63



Email
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 05:44:39 AM »

I sat on one at the St Louis motorcycle show last week.
It felt much lighter than even the claimed weight.
Logged
gurock1
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 15
Offline Offline

Location: Chicago
Bikes Owned: 2004 Silverwing 2009 Burgman 650 gone but not forgotten, 2007 Piaggio BV250 (Sold) 2006 FJR gone to bike heaven, 2006 FJR sold, 2008 FJR in heaven with the first 06 FJR, 2006 Burgman 650 Executive, BMW C 650 GT
Posts: 1645

Thank You
-Given: 16
-Receive: 95



Email
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2018, 09:47:42 AM »

If I can keep the FJR a few more years I’d want to make a deal for one of those as a couple year old bike.
Logged
Maggie
Administrator
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 168
Offline Offline

Location: St. Louis
Bikes Owned: The Fastest Ever Bet & Win 310cc ~ Tsunami 650cc ~ 09 TMax ~ 09 DN-01 ~ 17 Sypder RT-Limited
Posts: 15556

Thank You
-Given: 333
-Receive: 813


Let's Ride!!!!!!


« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2018, 06:28:06 PM »

Umm thatís pretty sweet looking! 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Logged

It's a scooterful day in the neighborhood!
Greg
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 4215

Thank You
-Given: 62
-Receive: 250


Don't sweat the small stuff...it's all small stuff


Email
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2018, 07:27:01 PM »

I think Hondaís hit a home with this new-design Gold Wing GL1800.  The new design is radical in appearance compared to the model introduced in 2001, but itís fresh, keeping up with the industry trends in motorcycle design.  I like that itís offered in both full touring and bagger models, which should make it attractive to a wider consumer base.  The automatic transmission version is going to make it a choice for those who prefer not to do the shifting themselves, even if it results in a small loss of power to the rear wheel.  But the big thing is dropping 90 pounds from previous versions.  While other makes have gotten heavier, the Gold Wing has gotten lighter, giving it an edge over Yamaha and H-D.  BMW is still fairly light, and Kawasaki hasnít offered up anything new or remarkable since it re-introduced the Vulcan Voyager 1700 a few years ago.  It wasnít a remarkable motorcycle then, either.  This new Gold Wing should be a winner.
Logged

Greg
minimac
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 12
Offline Offline

Location: Oswego, NY
Posts: 1585

Thank You
-Given: 52
-Receive: 105



Email
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2018, 02:57:01 AM »

I tried one on for size. I'm not impressed. The bags & trunk is even smaller than the last one. The automatic will no doubt be appealing to some, but ,sorry, without the trunk, it's just another cruiser. A Goldwing was ALWAYS the touring gold standard. Now, it's just another big bike.
Logged

Walk fast...look worried.
"If you can make a girl laugh, you can make her do anything"       Marilyn Monroe
Goldwing Aspencade GL1500
Burgman Executive 650
Majesty 400 x2
Morphous 250
Clampett
Uncle Jed
Administrator
Scooter Junior Professor
*****

Karma: 12
Offline Offline

Location: Clampett Valley near Gardendale, AL
Bikes Owned: 29 - Mini bikes to Gold Wings.
Posts: 351

Thank You
-Given: 93
-Receive: 80



WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2018, 04:30:34 AM »

I've had 7 GL's previously. I have a CTX1300D now for my big cruiser. The bags on this new GL are smaller in capacity than my CTX (which are small in my opinion).
Seems to me the bags are being slightly reduced in size while the actual usable storage space inside is being greatly reduced on Honda bikes.
My ideal tourer would be a Silverwing with DCT/shaft drive WITHOUT reducing the storage/step through of course.
Having said that, I still find the new design appealing. And if I were half my current age and had a pillion, would probably be down at the Honda stealership arranging to purchase one even with my perceived negatives.
Logged

--
Larry  
My Maps
Greg
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 4215

Thank You
-Given: 62
-Receive: 250


Don't sweat the small stuff...it's all small stuff


Email
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2018, 08:29:44 PM »

On thinking about the new Wing I came to the conclusion that a great part of the weight reduction is the result of downsizing the luggage.  That much is disappointing, to say the least.  When it comes to touring, you do want as much luggage capacity as possible.  The other thing, apparently, is a smaller fuel capacity and the new front suspension is apparently lighter than the previous dual fork set up.  That being said, I think Honda may have done all this as a nod to sporty handling.  The previous editions of the GL1800 have been proven good handlers.  I always called mine a sport bike on steroids.  Definitely a larger sport touring machine.  This new one is likely an even better handling bike, but at the expense of storage space.  Who wants to go on a long tour on a big, fancy bike, only to have to strap a duffel bag on the back seat for the rest of the stuff you want to take along.

Of course one could always do what one fellow did, years ago.  He jumped on his bike with only his toothbrush and the clothes he was wearing, and rode from California, all around the U.S.  No luggage, no bags except a small one for his rain gear.  Just in case.  He'd go for several days until he couldn't stand himself, then he'd stop at a Salvation Army second had store, buy a new set of clothes, rent a motel room and take a shower, then ride on and repeat.  Not sure I'd want to do that, but it's one way to get around the luggage space and trying to decide what to take on a long trip.
Logged
Dan
Administrator
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 24
Offline Offline

Location: Boston
Posts: 7500

Thank You
-Given: 224
-Receive: 362


Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'


« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2018, 08:40:29 PM »

On thinking about the new Wing I came to the conclusion that a great part of the weight reduction is the result of downsizing the luggage...

I don't know the difference in luggage capacity between the new Wing and old but if the Honda's side cases still can swallow a full face helmet (I'm guessing it can) then it is still a substantial amount of space.  Also, I don't think the luggage size makes a great deal of difference in weight.  I'm thinking it's mostly air with a plastic shell around it.  The top box is still standard so there is plenty of luggage capacity, even if it is reduced overall to some degree.

The fuel tank was reduced in size but according to Honda the range remains the same because of the newer bike having a more efficient motor so that's probably a worthy change to make the bike lighter.

I understand that when you take a feature away it feels like you are getting less but if the overall machine is better then it's probably a good move forward.  Of course I'm saying this without ever owned or even taken one for a ride.  I did sit on one at a bike show once, that's about it. 
Logged
Greg
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 4215

Thank You
-Given: 62
-Receive: 250


Don't sweat the small stuff...it's all small stuff


Email
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2018, 10:07:03 AM »

On thinking about the new Wing I came to the conclusion that a great part of the weight reduction is the result of downsizing the luggage...

I don't know the difference in luggage capacity between the new Wing and old but if the Honda's side cases still can swallow a full face helmet (I'm guessing it can) then it is still a substantial amount of space.  Also, I don't think the luggage size makes a great deal of difference in weight.  I'm thinking it's mostly air with a plastic shell around it.  The top box is still standard so there is plenty of luggage capacity, even if it is reduced overall to some degree.

The fuel tank was reduced in size but according to Honda the range remains the same because of the newer bike having a more efficient motor so that's probably a worthy change to make the bike lighter.

I understand that when you take a feature away it feels like you are getting less but if the overall machine is better then it's probably a good move forward.  Of course I'm saying this without ever owned or even taken one for a ride.  I did sit on one at a bike show once, that's about it. 

The GL1500 had the largest capacity in both the trunk and the saddlebags.  The luggage was downsized for the GL1800, but was still fairly large.  This new Wing has definitely smaller luggage.  The bike review by “Rider” magazine even commented on it.  I doubt the saddlebags will hold a full face helmet, though.  The helmet barely fit in the GL1800’s bags.

I used to remove the luggage in the winter so I could do a complete cleaning and check to make sure nothing was broken, loose or missing.  I was surprised at how heavy that stuff was.  I suspect that new, lighter, yet stronger metals account for some of the weight loss, too.

I’d love to take one of these for a test ride and see how it compares with the GL1800 previous edition.
Logged
Dan
Administrator
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 24
Offline Offline

Location: Boston
Posts: 7500

Thank You
-Given: 224
-Receive: 362


Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'


« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2018, 01:20:50 PM »

The GL1500 had the largest capacity in both the trunk and the saddlebags.  The luggage was downsized for the GL1800, but was still fairly large.  This new Wing has definitely smaller luggage.  The bike review by ďRiderĒ magazine even commented on it.  I doubt the saddlebags will hold a full face helmet, though.  The helmet barely fit in the GL1800ís bags.

I used to remove the luggage in the winter so I could do a complete cleaning and check to make sure nothing was broken, loose or missing.  I was surprised at how heavy that stuff was.  I suspect that new, lighter, yet stronger metals account for some of the weight loss, too.

That's interesting.  By comparison my luggage on the Versys LT will hold a full face helmet and when off the bike and empty they are quite light.  According to the bathroom scale they are eight pounds each.

I just did some digging and you're right about the capacity of the GW being substantially smaller.  Here are two bits from a press release.

"The top box still holds two full-face helmets, but total luggage capacity is now 110 litres down from 147L."

Followed by:

"Honda claims they researched current owners and found they used the bike for only 2-3 day tours, so they didnít need as much luggage capacity."

It's actually a pretty good and thorough article if you wish to read:

https://motorbikewriter.com/2018-honda-goldwing-sheds-weight/

Always learning!
Logged
Clampett
Uncle Jed
Administrator
Scooter Junior Professor
*****

Karma: 12
Offline Offline

Location: Clampett Valley near Gardendale, AL
Bikes Owned: 29 - Mini bikes to Gold Wings.
Posts: 351

Thank You
-Given: 93
-Receive: 80



WWW
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2018, 04:49:10 PM »

Yeah, yeah....you guys are gonna be so green next year when we start our speeder bike production:
Logged
Greg
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 4215

Thank You
-Given: 62
-Receive: 250


Don't sweat the small stuff...it's all small stuff


Email
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2018, 07:18:16 PM »

The GL1500 had the largest capacity in both the trunk and the saddlebags.  The luggage was downsized for the GL1800, but was still fairly large.  This new Wing has definitely smaller luggage.  The bike review by “Rider” magazine even commented on it.  I doubt the saddlebags will hold a full face helmet, though.  The helmet barely fit in the GL1800’s bags.

I used to remove the luggage in the winter so I could do a complete cleaning and check to make sure nothing was broken, loose or missing.  I was surprised at how heavy that stuff was.  I suspect that new, lighter, yet stronger metals account for some of the weight loss, too.

That's interesting.  By comparison my luggage on the Versys LT will hold a full face helmet and when off the bike and empty they are quite light.  According to the bathroom scale they are eight pounds each.

I just did some digging and you're right about the capacity of the GW being substantially smaller.  Here are two bits from a press release.

"The top box still holds two full-face helmets, but total luggage capacity is now 110 litres down from 147L."

Followed by:

"Honda claims they researched current owners and found they used the bike for only 2-3 day tours, so they didn’t need as much luggage capacity."

It's actually a pretty good and thorough article if you wish to read:

https://motorbikewriter.com/2018-honda-goldwing-sheds-weight/

Always learning!

That survey is interesting.  I’m surprised that Honda would produce a motorcycle, originally intended for long distance touring, that would be good for just 2-3 day tours.  I wonder what segment of the riding population they surveyed.  Perhaps it’s a nod to those older riders who don’t feel they’re up to tours longer than that.  Or perhaps they’re suggesting, in a roundabout way, that if one wants to go longer, then pull a cargo trailer.  Interesting.

I still get Rider Magazine and I’ve noticed that a lot of the smaller bikes also have fairly large saddlebags, panniers, if you will, and many will accommodate a helmet.  The trunk I had on my Vstrom wouldn’t hold my full face helmet, a Shoei flip front helmet, but I suspect an open face helmet would have fit.  But I do have to chuckle at the reviews that extoll the virtue of a large trunk that will hold 2 large helmet, because doing that precludes the intended use of a trunk to hold items for touring.  We used our trunk to hold things like cameras, tennis shoes, rain gear, first aid kits, etc.  If we wanted the trunk to hold our helmets, we couldn’t have put anything else in it.  But that was just us.  We always rode prepared for pretty much anything that might come up.  And sometimes it did.
Logged
Dan
Administrator
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 24
Offline Offline

Location: Boston
Posts: 7500

Thank You
-Given: 224
-Receive: 362


Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'


« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2018, 07:50:00 PM »

Iím surprised that Honda would produce a motorcycle, originally intended for long distance touring, that would be good for just 2-3 day tours.

That kind of depends on the rider and what they feel they need. I took a ten day trip on my Ninja with three soft bags.  With luggage it seems that however much you have, you will fill it up.
Logged
Greg
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 21
Offline Offline

Location: Wasilla, AK
Posts: 4215

Thank You
-Given: 62
-Receive: 250


Don't sweat the small stuff...it's all small stuff


Email
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2018, 05:29:58 PM »

I’m surprised that Honda would produce a motorcycle, originally intended for long distance touring, that would be good for just 2-3 day tours.

That kind of depends on the rider and what they feel they need. I took a ten day trip on my Ninja with three soft bags.  With luggage it seems that however much you have, you will fill it up.

That is most certainly true.  No matter how long or short a trip we took, we never failed to completely fill up both saddlebags and the trunk.  And I’m talking about each of us riding our own bike.  Interestingly, in 1990, we did a near 6-week long tour of the PNW, 2-up on a Kawasaki Voyager XII.  We filled up the luggage and had to send stuff home because we had too much stuff.  That was the trip in which I learned how to compact my stuff by rolling up my clothes and putting them in a stuff bag.  We were amazed at how much stuff we could pack by doing it that way.
Logged
gurock1
Doctor of Scooterology
*****

Karma: 15
Offline Offline

Location: Chicago
Bikes Owned: 2004 Silverwing 2009 Burgman 650 gone but not forgotten, 2007 Piaggio BV250 (Sold) 2006 FJR gone to bike heaven, 2006 FJR sold, 2008 FJR in heaven with the first 06 FJR, 2006 Burgman 650 Executive, BMW C 650 GT
Posts: 1645

Thank You
-Given: 16
-Receive: 95



Email
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2018, 08:27:05 PM »

Dan, I had that problem for a long time and still do a little.  Over time I learned to get more picky with what I pack and also the improvements in gear have helped.  Now I have gear that's water proof and often don't need to pack the rain suit.  I've gotten much more picky over the years about what makes it into my luggage.  For one thing I did a trip where the luggage was too full for my mini-compressor and then needed to fill a tire.  It's just so easy to pack the wrong thing.  I once made a trip on an FJR with a questionably bad battery, so I packed my jumper cables and a second battery in the luggage just in case.  This business of luggage packing is always a bit of a conundrum just like packing for the weather you're expecting to get.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page December 29, 2018, 11:23:26 PM