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Greg
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« on: January 08, 2018, 09:29:57 AM »

I hope this is the proper place to post this, but Iíve been looking at Google Maps, at places and roads we rode when we lived in Idaho.  I know that most of the Maxi Scoots folks seem to live east of the Mississippe, but Iíd like to encourage you all to consider riding out west.  And if you do, I highly recommend Idaho as a fun place to ride.  Yes, Yellowstone, the Beartooth Pass road, the Tetons and Glacier Natíl Park are all the big draw places to experience, especially on a motorcycle/scooter.  But Idaho offers a lot of riding in some very scenic settings, with some challenging roads.  One of the good ones is Hwy 21 that takes off from the east end of Boise and winds through the mountains to Idaho City, the community of Lowman and on to Stanley, Id.  This was one of our most favorite rides.  Between Idaho City and Lowman, for 38 miles the road looks like a pile of spaghetti, with numerous switchback curves and 6000 foot mountain summits and great views.  If you like riding the twisties, this is a great one.

The ride from Idaho to McCall on Hwy 55 is another great ride, and thereís a great Chinese restaurant in McCall.  And of course Hwy 12 running between Lewiston and Missoula, over Lolo Pass is billed as one of the premier motorcycling roads in America, and rightly so.  You could spend over a week touring Idaho.  I guess Iím posting this because I do miss that and want you all to enjoy what we enjoyed for 10 years.  The Pacific Northwest seems to get lost amid draws like the BRP and the Natchez Trace Parkway, and I think folks who tour on motorcycle are missing out on some great roads and areas for riding.  And thereís a lot of great history in the PNW, as well.

So when you all are making your plans for summer travel, consider heading out west.  It may be a bit farther than you might normally travel, but in my opinion, itís well worth the extra distance and time to experience some of the best motorcycling roads in the country.
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 02:04:15 PM »

Pete and I hope to make it out that way before our bucket list kicks the bucket.  One of our club members, Uncle Jerry, Pete and myself talked about shipping our bikes out to Washington and riding back home over a 3 week adventure.  Sadly we never got to do that, he had a bad accident and quit riding. Uncle Jerry had an "in" with a trucking company and it was dirt cheap to have the bikes sent out.
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2018, 08:04:45 PM »

Greg, those are great roads, I bet!  The only part of Idaho I've made it to was the southern part going from Yellowstone/Grand Teton to Jackpot Nevada and then south across Nevada to Vegas.  The western part of the country is filled with superb riding roads.  Take my word for it the granduer of the west is incredible.  You are also very right when you say that the famous spots have a way of drawing all the attention.  I've done Yellowstone/Grand Teton, Badlands, Mt Rushmore and Sitting Bull, Beartooth Pass, and the Chief Joseph Highway.  These are all the very famous parts in that area.  However due to lack of time I had to high tail both times from there across southern Idaho and down into Nevada.

I don't in anyway want to lessen the quality of the good riding in the east, but it's different then the west.  The east has lower altitudes, things closer together, more water, and more hardwood forest.  In the west 50-100 miles to a gas station is more common.  At the same time the nature itself is more large.  There is a ride for example in Utah where it is about 150 miles and the altitudes range from 4,500 feet to 9,800 feet.  Or there is a ride over the top of the white mountain in Texas (just outside of El Paso going northeast) where it's about 165 miles between gas stations and when I was on it using the Silverwing I had to turn back or I'd of run out of gas in the mountains.

As much as riding in the west is fabulous and that's not mentioning northern Idaho, northern Montana, Oregon and Washington, as I've never ridden those areas, the bad part for those of us that live east of the Mississippi is that we have to cross the plains states to get there.  No matter which way you do it, and I've done them all, you have to travel the better part of 800 miles across totally boring plains to get there.  In the north route there's Wisconsin farm country, Minnesota farm country, and South Dakota farm country.  In the center it's either Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska and eastern Colorado or Illinois, Missouri on I 70, Kansas and eastern Colorado.  In the south it's either Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and two thirds of Texas.  Anyway you look at it there's going to be this long flat expanse to get to the beautiful parts beyond.  Many times I've done the boring part like an Ironbutt ride.  Something like Chicago to Denver on the first day, or Chicago to central South Dakota on the first day, or Chicago to Texarkana on the first day.  The only one of thse with good riding at all is the Chicago to Texarkana as you can digress in southeast Missouri and Arkansas.  One time I did Chicago to Baton Rogue and across on I 10 in January.  That way the next day is almost as bad as the first and I'd only do it to avoid weather.

This entire proposition is leaving out California.  IMHO California has the best riding in the country.  It has mountains that get up as high as anywhere in the country, national parks from Joshua Tree to Death Valley to Sequoia and Kings Canyon to Yellowstone.  In addition there is the ride on Highway 1 from Carmel to San Diego.  California is the only place I've ridden where at three in the afternoon you could go 100 miles without seeing a person, a building or any sign of life other then the road itself.

I think one year a member tried to make a western rally, but it didn't work out more then anything due to distances.  But for anyone here who hasn't done it the riding west of the Mississippi is magnificent.  Maybe the best way for me to explain is simply saying that the first time I crossed America on a bike I took the old US 66 route both way because I was too scared to ride the Colorado mountains on two wheels.
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Greg
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2018, 04:24:10 AM »

We rode the Colorado mountains one time and had a ball.  Lots of great roads and plenty scenery to look at.  We were riding ST1300's, which made all those curvy roads a breeze to ride.  PeggySuz says that's where she learned to really ride.  Top of the world was Independence Pass at 12,500' elevation.

I hate to bring up Idaho 21 again, but you need to look it up in Google Maps and see what it looks like.  It's as challenging as it looks on the map.  It was our go-to ride for a quickie 160 mile ride.  Gotta stop at Trudy's Kitchen in Idaho City.  Good food.  Trudy loves riders, too.

Check out Hell's Canyon of the Snake River on the Idaho/Oregon border.  It's deeper than Grand Canyon.  Just not as pretty.

Ride Hwy 12 across Idaho from Lewiston to Missoula, along the Clearwater River and over Lolo Pass.

Ride up Hey 93 north out of Twin Falls to Sun Valley, then up over Galena Summit at 9000' elevation, and then down into Stanley, Id.

Take U.S. Hwy 95 up the western edge of Idaho to New Meadows, then up to Riggins.  Past Riggins is Whitebird,where you can visit the scene of a battleground where the U.S. Cavalry shot it out with the New Pierce Indians.  And while the Whitebird grade is long and steep, try riding the old Whitebird Grade.  It's steep with lots of tight switchback curves.  If you feel up to it, it's a challenge that you can congratulate yourself for having conquered.  I recommend doing it Uphill.

Then there's riding in Oregon.  We loved riding in Oregon.  Their roads are superb no matter where they are. Northern Idaho is riding Mecca.  Just know that traffic in the Portland area is insane.  All day long.  Be sure to ride the Columbia Gorge on I-84 on the Oregon side, then cross over and ride it on the Washington side.  East of The Dalles, Or, but on the Washington side, there is a recreation of Stonehenge.  Pretty interesting.  And if you get to The Dalles or Hood River, be sure to ride up Mt. Hood.

Anyway, there's lots to see, and too little time to do it.  Things are different out west.
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2018, 07:04:39 AM »

We rode the Colorado mountains one time and had a ball.  Lots of great roads and plenty scenery to look at.  We were riding ST1300's, which made all those curvy roads a breeze to ride.  PeggySuz says that's where she learned to really ride.  Top of the world was Independence Pass at 12,500' elevation.

I hate to bring up Idaho 21 again, but you need to look it up in Google Maps and see what it looks like.  It's as challenging as it looks on the map.  It was our go-to ride for a quickie 160 mile ride.  Gotta stop at Trudy's Kitchen in Idaho City.  Good food.  Trudy loves riders, too.

Check out Hell's Canyon of the Snake River on the Idaho/Oregon border.  It's deeper than Grand Canyon.  Just not as pretty.

Ride Hwy 12 across Idaho from Lewiston to Missoula, along the Clearwater River and over Lolo Pass.

Ride up Hey 93 north out of Twin Falls to Sun Valley, then up over Galena Summit at 9000' elevation, and then down into Stanley, Id.

Take U.S. Hwy 95 up the western edge of Idaho to New Meadows, then up to Riggins.  Past Riggins is Whitebird,where you can visit the scene of a battleground where the U.S. Cavalry shot it out with the New Pierce Indians.  And while the Whitebird grade is long and steep, try riding the old Whitebird Grade.  It's steep with lots of tight switchback curves.  If you feel up to it, it's a challenge that you can congratulate yourself for having conquered.  I recommend doing it Uphill.

Then there's riding in Oregon.  We loved riding in Oregon.  Their roads are superb no matter where they are. Northern Idaho is riding Mecca.  Just know that traffic in the Portland area is insane.  All day long.  Be sure to ride the Columbia Gorge on I-84 on the Oregon side, then cross over and ride it on the Washington side.  East of The Dalles, Or, but on the Washington side, there is a recreation of Stonehenge.  Pretty interesting.  And if you get to The Dalles or Hood River, be sure to ride up Mt. Hood.

Anyway, there's lots to see, and too little time to do it.  Things are different out west.

Greg,  you really brought back the memories.   Bob and I rode out to Billings, MT in July of 2015 to the BMW Rally. We got to ride Beartooth Pass, Chief Joseph Scenic Hwy. to name a few.  After the rally we headed west to Lolo Pass and Hwy 12 to Lewiston.  Awesome, awesome roads.  Then we made a large loop see picture below.  My highlighted route is a bit crooked but you get the idea. So many of the roads you mentioned we were on.  That trip was 16 days and 5300 miles.

We do love riding out west but as Rich mentioned you need a much longer amount of time to reach such fantastic roads and scenery.  We have considered trailering the bikes, and storing the truck and the trailer somewhere just to get through the boring miles quicker. 



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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2018, 03:24:02 PM »

We do love riding out west but as Rich mentioned you need a much longer amount of time to reach such fantastic roads and scenery.  We have considered trailering the bikes, and storing the truck and the trailer somewhere just to get through the boring miles quicker.

A great thought. Never say never, but riding across the country doesn't seem very likely for me. Now with a trailer capable of hauling motorcycles, and just about anything else I might want to bring, and unloading for local riding in other parts of the country, the likelihood rises somewhat.

Idaho and nearby inland states are in a part of the country I have yet to visit. There are others, but getting out and experiencing a previously unknown to me part of the country is a pleasure. Greg's knowledge of and enthusiasm for places like Idaho helps put the thought in mind.
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2018, 06:36:32 PM »

This is the kind of gold you want to mine from a thread. Exactly what I was looking for my trip south. Have already pulled the routes and loaded in my garmin. Thanks Greg.

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Greg
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 03:57:49 AM »

We rode the Colorado mountains one time and had a ball.  Lots of great roads and plenty scenery to look at.  We were riding ST1300's, which made all those curvy roads a breeze to ride.  PeggySuz says that's where she learned to really ride.  Top of the world was Independence Pass at 12,500' elevation.

I hate to bring up Idaho 21 again, but you need to look it up in Google Maps and see what it looks like.  It's as challenging as it looks on the map.  It was our go-to ride for a quickie 160 mile ride.  Gotta stop at Trudy's Kitchen in Idaho City.  Good food.  Trudy loves riders, too.

Check out Hell's Canyon of the Snake River on the Idaho/Oregon border.  It's deeper than Grand Canyon.  Just not as pretty.

Ride Hwy 12 across Idaho from Lewiston to Missoula, along the Clearwater River and over Lolo Pass.

Ride up Hey 93 north out of Twin Falls to Sun Valley, then up over Galena Summit at 9000' elevation, and then down into Stanley, Id.

Take U.S. Hwy 95 up the western edge of Idaho to New Meadows, then up to Riggins.  Past Riggins is Whitebird,where you can visit the scene of a battleground where the U.S. Cavalry shot it out with the New Pierce Indians.  And while the Whitebird grade is long and steep, try riding the old Whitebird Grade.  It's steep with lots of tight switchback curves.  If you feel up to it, it's a challenge that you can congratulate yourself for having conquered.  I recommend doing it Uphill.

Then there's riding in Oregon.  We loved riding in Oregon.  Their roads are superb no matter where they are. Northern Idaho is riding Mecca.  Just know that traffic in the Portland area is insane.  All day long.  Be sure to ride the Columbia Gorge on I-84 on the Oregon side, then cross over and ride it on the Washington side.  East of The Dalles, Or, but on the Washington side, there is a recreation of Stonehenge.  Pretty interesting.  And if you get to The Dalles or Hood River, be sure to ride up Mt. Hood.

Anyway, there's lots to see, and too little time to do it.  Things are different out west.

Greg,  you really brought back the memories.   Bob and I rode out to Billings, MT in July of 2015 to the BMW Rally. We got to ride Beartooth Pass, Chief Joseph Scenic Hwy. to name a few.  After the rally we headed west to Lolo Pass and Hwy 12 to Lewiston.  Awesome, awesome roads.  Then we made a large loop see picture below.  My highlighted route is a bit crooked but you get the idea. So many of the roads you mentioned we were on.  That trip was 16 days and 5300 miles.

We do love riding out west but as Rich mentioned you need a much longer amount of time to reach such fantastic roads and scenery.  We have considered trailering the bikes, and storing the truck and the trailer somewhere just to get through the boring miles quicker. 




[/quo
We rode the Colorado mountains one time and had a ball.  Lots of great roads and plenty scenery to look at.  We were riding ST1300's, which made all those curvy roads a breeze to ride.  PeggySuz says that's where she learned to really ride.  Top of the world was Independence Pass at 12,500' elevation.

I hate to bring up Idaho 21 again, but you need to look it up in Google Maps and see what it looks like.  It's as challenging as it looks on the map.  It was our go-to ride for a quickie 160 mile ride.  Gotta stop at Trudy's Kitchen in Idaho City.  Good food.  Trudy loves riders, too.

Check out Hell's Canyon of the Snake River on the Idaho/Oregon border.  It's deeper than Grand Canyon.  Just not as pretty.

Ride Hwy 12 across Idaho from Lewiston to Missoula, along the Clearwater River and over Lolo Pass.

Ride up Hey 93 north out of Twin Falls to Sun Valley, then up over Galena Summit at 9000' elevation, and then down into Stanley, Id.

Take U.S. Hwy 95 up the western edge of Idaho to New Meadows, then up to Riggins.  Past Riggins is Whitebird,where you can visit the scene of a battleground where the U.S. Cavalry shot it out with the New Pierce Indians.  And while the Whitebird grade is long and steep, try riding the old Whitebird Grade.  It's steep with lots of tight switchback curves.  If you feel up to it, it's a challenge that you can congratulate yourself for having conquered.  I recommend doing it Uphill.

Then there's riding in Oregon.  We loved riding in Oregon.  Their roads are superb no matter where they are. Northern Idaho is riding Mecca.  Just know that traffic in the Portland area is insane.  All day long.  Be sure to ride the Columbia Gorge on I-84 on the Oregon side, then cross over and ride it on the Washington side.  East of The Dalles, Or, but on the Washington side, there is a recreation of Stonehenge.  Pretty interesting.  And if you get to The Dalles or Hood River, be sure to ride up Mt. Hood.

Anyway, there's lots to see, and too little time to do it.  Things are different out west.

Greg,  you really brought back the memories.   Bob and I rode out to Billings, MT in July of 2015 to the BMW Rally. We got to ride Beartooth Pass, Chief Joseph Scenic Hwy. to name a few.  After the rally we headed west to Lolo Pass and Hwy 12 to Lewiston.  Awesome, awesome roads.  Then we made a large loop see picture below.  My highlighted route is a bit crooked but you get the idea. So many of the roads you mentioned we were on.  That trip was 16 days and 5300 miles.

We do love riding out west but as Rich mentioned you need a much longer amount of time to reach such fantastic roads and scenery.  We have considered trailering the bikes, and storing the truck and the trailer somewhere just to get through the boring miles quicker. 





We have ridden that route more than once.  Great rides there.
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Greg
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 04:05:01 AM »

We do love riding out west but as Rich mentioned you need a much longer amount of time to reach such fantastic roads and scenery.  We have considered trailering the bikes, and storing the truck and the trailer somewhere just to get through the boring miles quicker.

A great thought. Never say never, but riding across the country doesn't seem very likely for me. Now with a trailer capable of hauling motorcycles, and just about anything else I might want to bring, and unloading for local riding in other parts of the country, the likelihood rises somewhat.

Idaho and nearby inland states are in a part of the country I have yet to visit. There are others, but getting out and experiencing a previously unknown to me part of the country is a pleasure. Greg's knowledge of and enthusiasm for places like Idaho helps put the thought in mind.

There's a lot of fun poked at folks who trailer their bikes somewhere, but in my opinion, if you have along way to go to where you want to ride, trailering the bike or bikes makes a lot of sense.  I wouldn't have any problem doing that myself if I had the means to do so.  A big benefit to trailering is that you arrive at your destination a bit quicker and not worn out from riding 2000 miles to get there.  And after touring the area you want to do, you won't have to ride 2000 miles back.
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Greg
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2018, 04:09:05 AM »

This is the kind of gold you want to mine from a thread. Exactly what I was looking for my trip south. Have already pulled the routes and loaded in my garmin. Thanks Greg.

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I'm always glad to share what I know, where we've been.  I might have some suggestions for you if your trip takes you into Idaho and NE Oregon.  We've got an active week ahead, but after that, we need to get together over a cup somewhere.
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« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2018, 02:57:43 PM »

I would love to ride in Idaho and Montana.  I think the best way for me to do it is to fly out there and rent a bike.  Someday.
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« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2018, 05:32:42 PM »

I can vouch for Montana! At least the Eastern half. I only stepped foot into Idaho a batch of years ago when I was in Spokane, WA but the lake we visited was really nice.
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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2018, 06:45:42 PM »

I can vouch for Montana! At least the Eastern half. I only stepped foot into Idaho a batch of years ago when I was in Spokane, WA but the lake we visited was really nice.


Must have been Priest Lake.  Itís a very beautiful and popular place.  Unless it was Lake Coeur díAlene, another beautiful lake.
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2018, 06:50:26 PM »

I can vouch for Montana! At least the Eastern half. I only stepped foot into Idaho a batch of years ago when I was in Spokane, WA but the lake we visited was really nice.


Must have been Priest Lake.  Itís a very beautiful and popular place.  Unless it was Lake Coeur díAlene, another beautiful lake.

There were boats and water and (IIRC) tall cliffs & that's about all I remember. One of the board members took Wifey and I over for the day.

I just had a peek at the map & I'll bet on Lake Coeur d'Alene 'cause we didn't drive that far before he put his boat in the water. Being a Mississippi River Rat lookin' at all that clear water can be kind'a scary. 
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