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Author Topic: Heated Clothes  (Read 1409 times)
covert
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covert@olypen.com
« on: September 18, 2012, 01:14:45 AM »

I posted this on Modern Vespa, but I am looking for first hand experience...

Know if the BV350's charging system is sufficient to run a heated vest and gloves

Gloves
Current    2.2 amps
Watts    27 watts

Vest
Current    4.5 amps
Watts    54 watts

http://gerbing.com/
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2012, 02:45:18 AM »

I don't know exactly what your answer is.  It appears that you have about 8amps to use for accessories (total).  Your proposed "electrics" are within those specs.

What I can give you is my experience using them on my Silverwing.

The microwire version will be more comfortable than the earlier model I own.  If buying new you will get this microwire version. 
 
Get the dual controller,  it is worth being able to control them separately.

Buy and use a battery tender during the heated gear season.  I use mine year round!

Buy a good battery charger and give your battery a full cycle charge every now and then.  Got mine for about $40.

If you like "on-board reporting" you can install any number of voltmeters that are available.  Mine also has an audible alarm to let you know that the air temp has dropped below freezing.  Just another reminder to avoid any moist areas (may be black ice).

Lastly, your ride will be more pleasant with these items than without.  That is my experience.
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Paul

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covert
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covert@olypen.com
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2012, 06:49:45 AM »

Thanks Paul,  I remember a time when I was riding on I-90 crossing the pass.  As I climbed in moderately heavy rain there were electronic monitors that registered pavement temperatures. I started in the high 40s and kept creeping down.  Just before the highest point the signs said it was 33 out.  No the pavement did not freeze, but I swear I did.

Imagine absolute glee at the Seattle motorcycle show when I slipped my hands in some Gerbing gloves with the current flowing.  I have always ridden year round on the wet side of the mountains   I will not buy a new ride if I can't have some gear to break the frozen hand syndrome.
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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2012, 04:48:26 AM »

The worst and most often result of overloading the electrical system is frying the stater, replacement on most motorbikes requires partial engine disassembly, is no fun to do or pay to have done. Make sure the amp numbers are peak draw and not average or normal. Amperage draw for many items peak at turn on and then decrease to normal, not sure about heated clothing items but you want to ensure using the figure for most amperage the item could draw. Finding if you have at least 8 amps reserve is fairly simple, find the max amperage your motorbike electrical system is designed to supply, most often provided in the owner's manual. Add together the amperage of all installed items, headlight (use the bright light figure), tail, brake, accessory outlet, etc. subtract that figure from the the system output number. The difference is how many amps you have in reserve. The standard rule of thumb is to allow 10% reserve, not to exceed a load in excess of 90% of system capacity.
   In addition to being more comfortable, modern micro wire, carbon fiber and such clothing uses less amperage than most of the older toaster oven type clothing. Also, due to needing less power most heated clothing companies offer accessory batteries which are home charged and carried in a pocket. I have no idea concerning how long the batteries last before needing to be recharged but I intend to pick up a couple prior to cold weather. The PITA of heated gear is when leaving for a day ride I usually have to fill up, pick up a couple of drinks, etc. and each stop requires a unplugging and plugging ritual. So the pocket batteries could be used until stops are completed and then hook into electrical system. Of course the pocket batteries would make running a few winter errands much better.
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covert
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covert@olypen.com
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 09:28:34 PM »

Gerbing does sell integral battery operated gear.  Last time I was in the market was before microwire so thanks.  I realize the pain in the rear of stator replacement. Never had to do it and never .... (Gerbing is WA based and that is one of the reasons I mention them but will look for other makers.) For what it's worth -  Used to use dry chemical hot packs. they work fine for shooting sports but do not distribute heat under jackets that well.
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